About Us

Emily

Throughout her life Emily has lived with passion and purpose.

Despite a physically debilitating disease she is an accomplished dancer with several national titles. In June of 2014 she graduated from High school and is now in entering her third year at University.

Her inner strength and dedication has inspired an Army.

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis Defined:

Cystic fibrosis is a progressive, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time.

In people with CF, a defective gene causes a thick, buildup of mucus in the lungs, pancreas and other organs. In the lungs, the mucus clogs the airways and traps bacteria leading to infections, extensive lung damage and eventually, respiratory failure. In the pancreas, the mucus prevents the release of digestive enzymes that allow the body to break down food and absorb vital nutrients.c fibrosis is a progressive, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time.

In people with CF, a defective gene causes a thick, buildup of mucus in the lungs, pancreas and other organs. In the lungs, the mucus clogs the airways and traps bacteria leading to infections, extensive lung damage and eventually, respiratory failure. In the pancreas, the mucus prevents the release of digestive enzymes that allow the body to break down food and absorb vital nutrients.

for more information about Cystic Fibrosis, please visit www.cff.org

The Story Behind

"65 Roses"

The term "65 roses" was coined in the late-1960’s, by Richard (Ricky) Weiss a four-year-old with cystic fibrosis. The young boy’s mother, Mary G. Weiss, became a volunteer for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in 1965 after learning that all three of her sons had CF. To help fundraise, Weiss called made phone calls to gather support for CF research. Unbeknownst to Weiss, Ricky would be nearby, listening in on her calls.

One day, Ricky, at four-years-old, confronted his mother and told her that he knew about her calls. His mother was surprised, because she had kept any knowledge of the condition hidden from her sons. Confused, Weiss asked Ricky what he thought the phone calls were about, to which he answered, "You are working for 65 Roses."

Needless to say, his mother was incredibly moved by his innocent mispronunciation of cystic fibrosis, as have many since who hear the story.

To this day, the term "65 Roses" has been used by to help children put a name to their condition. The phrase has since become a registered trademark of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, which adopted the rose as its symbol.